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Precast Concrete Structures By Kim Elliottpdf



What makes precast concrete different from other forms of concrete construction? Whether concrete is precast, that is statically reinforced or pretension (prestressed), is not always apparent. It is only when we consider the role concrete will play in developing structural characteristics that its precast nature becomes significant. The most obvious definition of precast concrete is that it is concrete which has been prepared for casting, cast and cured in a location which is not its final destination. The distance traveled from the casting site may only be a few meters, where on-site precasting methods are used to avoid expensive haulage (or VAT in some countries), or maybe thousands of kilometers, in the case of high-value-added products where manufacturing and haulage costs are low. The grit basted architectural precast concrete in Figure 1.1 was manufactured 600 km from the site, whereas the precast concrete columns, beams, and walls traveled less than 60 m; wall panels have been stack-cast in layers between sheets of polythene adjacent to the final building.




Precast Concrete Structures By Kim Elliottpdf



A precast concrete element is, by definition, of a finite size and must, therefore, be joined to other elements to form a complete structure. A simple bearing ledge or corbel will suffice, as shown in Figure 1.3. But when thermal shrinkage or load-induced strains cause volumetric changes (and shortening or lengthening), the two precast elements try to move apart. Interface friction at the mating surface prevents movement, but in doing so creates a force F = μR which is capable of splitting both elements unless the section was suitably reinforced. Figure 1.5a shows an example of where frictional forces due to relative, unreinforced movement between precast slabs and beams caused spalling in the beam. In other cases, spurious positive bending moments due to the restraint of relative movement or end rotation have caused cracking in the soffit of slabs, or at a beam-to-column corbel connection.


In 1990, the chairman of the British Precast Concrete Federation (BPCF), Mr Geoff Brigginshaw, requested me what degree of educating was carried out in British universities in precast concrete building for multistorey buildings.


The reply, after all, was little or no, and stays that manner at the moment regardless of appreciable efforts by the BPCF and sections of the career to broadcast the deserves, and pitfalls of precast concrete constructions.


Having given lectures at about 25 UK universities on this topic, I estimate that lower than 5 per cent of our civil/structural engineering graduates find out about precast concrete, and fewer than this have an honest grounding within the design of precast concrete constructions.


'Precast Concrete Structures' introduces the subject in detail looking at the design process, manufacture and construction using precast concrete for multi-storey buildings. Detailed structural analysis of the material and its use is provided. The theory is supported by practical case studies and worked examples. There are explanatory illustrations throughout. Endorsed by the British Precast Concrete Federation and written by an acknowledged authority, this is the first book to explain and educate the student in the uses and advantages of precast concrete.


This second edition of Precast Concrete Structures introduces the conceptual design ideas for the prefabrication of concrete structures and presents a number of worked examples that translate designs from BS 8110 to Eurocode EC2, before going into the detail of the design, manufacture, and construction of precast concrete multi-storey buildings. Detailed structural analysis of precast concrete and its use is provided and some details are presented of recent precast skeletal frames of up to forty storeys.


The theory is supported by numerous worked examples to Eurocodes and European Product Standards for precast reinforced and prestressed concrete elements, composite construction, joints and connections and frame stability, together with extensive specifications for precast concrete structures. The book is extensively illustrated with over 500 photographs and line drawings.


"Precast Concrete Structures provides complete guidance for the analysis and design of precast concrete structures. This new edition brings all the material up to date with state of art of research, codes of practice and technology. Nevertheless, the author maintains his practical approach with many examples. For these reasons, Dr Elliotts book is a worldwide reference for academics, professionals and the precast industry."


"Professor Elliott draws upon his many years of research, experience, and expertise to introduce conceptual design ideas for the prefabrication of concrete structures and presents a number of worked examples of designs to Eurocode EC2, before going into the detail of the design, manufacture, and construction of precast concrete multi-storey buildings... "Precast Concrete Structures" is a critically important and core addition to professional and academic library Architectural Studies collections."


This second edition of Precast Concrete Structures introduces the conceptual design ideas for the prefabrication of concrete structures and presents a number of worked examples that translate designs from BS 8110to Eurocode EC2, before going into the detail of the design, manufacture, and construction of precast concrete multi-storey buildings. Detailed structural analysis of precast concrete and its use is provided and some details are presented of recent precast skeletal frames of up to forty storeys.


The theory is supported by numerous worked examples to Eurocodes and European Product Standards for precast reinforced and prestressed concrete elements, composite construction, joints and connections and frame stability, together with extensive specifications for precast concrete structures. The book is extensively illustrated with over 500 photographs and line drawings.


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